Toyota Kata – Explaining the Kata with a personal touch

Dear reader, in this blog post, I will shed light on the Toyota Kata with a personal touch. That means, in addition to a formal introduction, I have also included my own experiences and thought-provoking questions and opinions.

During this learning journey, we will get to know some facets and effects of the Kata, such as;

  • Why is it called “Toyota” Kata?
  • What significance Mike Rother’s research results could have for us?
  • How does it influence one’s own thinking processes?
  • What supposed advantages and possibilities result from it?

 

And, at the very end, a summary in the form of an elevator pitch. I hope you enjoy reading.

What is the Toyota Kata?

Answering this question for someone else who has not yet gained sufficient practical experience is something I still find exciting, even after almost three years. Why? Because I can still discover and learn something new every day.

For example, a week ago, I attended KataCon Europe, a convention where we share research, findings, learn together and have a great time networking. Following this convention lead to many new impressions and things I still need to reflect over.

Then I’m part of a learning group that People Centred Excellence organizes, and where Graham Canning, Mike Denison and Tilo Schwarz ensure that we can deepen our scientific thinking learning experience upon diverse challenges coming from the learning group themselves.

KataConEurope Quote Feed

That said, it might be a pity if I had to reduce the Kata to just a few words unless it was to explain to my daughter what daddy actually does. Or, of course, if you and I met and you did ask me the same question. So, for that purpose, I share an elevator pitch at the end of this blog post.

If I had to answer this question right now, I would probably say: “Kata, that is learning something every day by comparing what I believe and what an experiment shows me afterwards.”

“I’ve certainly rethought everything I thought I knew.”

Since I have come across Kata and experienced the potentials for myself, many things have indeed changed. For example, how I reflect on what I see and read. My Kata colleague Ann Hill from the UK recently quoted her NHS team at KataCon, saying: “Toyota Kata has challenged what we thought Lean was, I’ve certainly rethought everything I thought I knew.”

To be honest, I don’t feel much different about it, but why is that so?

Maybe that is because Kata teaches us a completely different way of dealing with our knowledge threshold, and we all have more of them than we tend to realise. Therefore, one observable effect of practising Kata might be that we learn to transfer thoughts from the subconscious to the conscious mind. By that, we get a good chance to re-evaluate our own thoughts daily.

Is that already Kata?

No. It is not quite that simple, and we should avoid jumping to a conclusion at this point. The latter is something our brain prefers to do, going from one moment to the next into that state of pretending to know, without our consciously noticing.

Kata is about more than simple results and outcomes. Kata is more about the way we get there and how we make it a conscious approach. Therefore, it is more a question of how I do something rather than purely looking at what I am doing in the first place. I found this remarkable because good and sustainable results cannot be achieved through thoughtless action.

Current Knowledge Threshold - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

If we look at the term “Kata” from the perspective of language, then “Kata” comes from the Japanese language and means pattern, small routines or a way of doing something. An athlete, for example, learning Karate, practises Karate-Kata. After long practice, small steps and movements become a routine and are then combined into a flow of different movements.

When I learned to play soccer, I first had to stop the ball and pass it on. Only much later did tactical processes come into play. All of this together emerges into situational awareness and behaviour on the field and during a match. In principle, the Toyota Kata is, therefore, more than the sum of its parts. However, to describe this in a blog post remains a challenge in itself.

Why “Toyota” Kata?

Why it is called “Toyota” Kata can be deduced from Mike Rother’s six years of research in which he tried to unlock further secrets of Toyota’s success. In the course of this work, he asked himself the following two questions:

(a) What are the unseen managerial routines and thinking that lie behind Toyota´s success with continuous improvement and adaptation?

(b) How can other companies develop similar routines and thinking in their organizations?

Toyota Kata Books and Scientific Thinking

As part of the global Lean community, I am, of course, very grateful for these questions because what drove Mike and many of his partners in the research was the fact that they had long suspected that there must be something deeper driving Toyota. We have observed that simply copying the visible artefacts is not enough to drive sustainable and, above all, continuous development and improvement of an organisation.

I observed something similar when I experimented with Lean tools for the first time more than 12 years ago. At that time, for example, I couldn’t understand why many of my colleagues weren’t into all the cool stuff that helped us make our problems and challenges so visible.

Of course, I was also naïve and indeed more blind than I am today because I now believe that analytical thinking and the joy of challenge are not the general attitudes. I wonder what the reason for that is, and I’ll certainly take that up again in another post.

As far as our experiments are concerned, we have, of course, had successes to celebrate. Unfortunately, however, most of them were relatively short-lived because the underlying mindsets were not conveyed at that time. The latter, I believe, was also due to the mechanistic top-down approach we typically used to implement something quickly these days.

At Toyota, you won’t find Toyota Kata

At Toyota itself, a Toyota Kata is unknown. The Kata is based on the research results in which Mike Rother, after numerous interviews with Toyota executives and Mikes own experiments, was able to identify a repetitive pattern of behaviour and acting. However, it should be noted that the executives in the interviews had difficulties describing exactly how they think and act.

But is that surprising when something has already become second nature?

If I ask a piano player, who has practised for thousands of hours, why he or she plays so well, and what is going on in his or her mind while he or she is playing, then he or she will not be able to make it tangible for me in a few words.

At Toyota, and undoubtedly interesting for Mike’s research, was the fact that every leader also has his or her own style. At this point, I would like to recommend Katie Anderson’s book “Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn”, in which she describes the learning journey of a former Toyota leader named Isao Yoshino. This book reveals more about the different styles that Mike might have encountered.

Four steps Improvement Kata - A non-linear way to overcome challenging goals - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

The pattern Mike Rother discovered was a scientific way of thinking that is passed on from leader to leader at Toyota and, of course, to each employee through a coaching style. This way of thinking and acting encourages employees and other leaders to avoid jumping to conclusions and instead become aware of their knowledge limitations and experiment quickly with new solutions.

What does this mean for us?

For example, we should be aware that when we copy solutions from Toyota, we are only holding a snapshot in our hands, never the underlying deeper understanding. Perhaps we would be better advised to address the second question of the research results and then develop our own solutions.

If I look at the current state of affairs in Denmark, there is undoubtedly much worthwhile work for all of us.

A difference that makes a difference

I stumbled across the Kata for the first time in 2018. Within a few seconds, I was overcome with a feeling that I might be a big step closer to a possible solution for my observations; A way to give all my colleagues and co-worker the chance to test their own ideas for continuous improvement of processes and systems. So promoting the opposite of what we have already seen does not work—top-down implementations.

I suddenly saw many things in a different light, including why we were so successful for a short time with an idea of a cross-functional team that involved many employees in developing solutions. If we had known about the Starter Kata back then, who knows, we might have developed our own long ago. Among other things, this would have made it easier for us to pass on to our employees the many good and sometimes very scientific approaches hidden in, e.g. the FMEA.

Unfortunately, however, time was against us at that time, and so APQP and PPAP remained instead artefacts and artefacts always have a terrible taste. Because if you have not been involved in developing methods and tools yourself, it becomes tough to convey the underlying ways of thinking.

Comparing what we expect to happen and what actually happens - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

The great advantage?

Perhaps this is also the great advantage of the Toyota Kata exercises. Because this is what it is all about in the first place. It develops basic ways of thinking and uses the newly acquired skills to build your own tools and methods that suit you.

To me, this is a difference that actually makes a difference.

Although I am still a vast Toyota and incredibly Lean fan – even if there is no clear description for it – I want to ask whether it is not time to entirely focus on one’s own ways of thinking and acting?

I don’t know if it is wise that we constantly fish for foreign solutions in foreign waters, when our own problems and challenges are very individual and, in my opinion, therefore also need unique solutions.

Maybe you could give me your perspective on this in the comments.

The components of Kata

The Kata that supports us in learning these basic ways of thinking and acting, a more scientific way of thinking, comes in two components that emerged from Mike Rother’s second research question.

One component we call the Improvement Kata, and it is the core based on a 4 step but non-linear model. The exercises that we do in the direction of a challenge and the perspective of the actual current condition lead after a while to a real meta-skill that we can apply in all aspects of life. 

The second component is what we call the Coaching Kata. This serves to create a learning environment for those who apply the Improvement Kata in which the “improver” achieves learning success through deliberate daily practice.

Change comes from repeated experiences with a new pattern - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

Start with Starter Kata

Both components can be practised using Starter Kata. However, these Starter Kata are only the prelude and not the goal. The Coaching Kata is primarily intended for managers who, thanks to this Coaching Kata, help their employees to develop this new way of thinking. But be careful; to coach at all, you first have to become good at applying the Improvement Kata yourself.

Also, we often see that some coaches think there is nothing more to learn or improve once they go and coach, but both Starter Kata go hand in hand. Isn’t it desirable in an organisation that everyone improves the business every day?

I don’t want to detail the two components in this blog post, but instead, I will elaborate on them in other blog posts. However, you may like reading the FAQ that I am linking here.

TPS is built on the scientific way of thinking…. How do I respond to this problem? Not a toolbox. [You have to be] willing to start small, learn through trial and error.

Hajime Ohba - One of Ohno’s students Tweet

The false claim when to start with Kata

From time to time, I run into claims that mention that practising Kata only makes sense if you can’t get any further with your Lean journey. But, unfortunately, whenever I run into these claims, it becomes obvious that somebody has not practised Kata for long. A pity, actually, because it reads like Toyota Kata and its Starter Kata are just used as another tool in their portfolio and not to develop a critical mass of people that can respond more scientifically to organisational challenges.

Developing this critical mass of people through a continuous learning journey might be a key challenge for any organisation who want to ensure their survival capabilities. If you like, you can read more about potential threats to the survival of an organisation here.

Jeffrey K Liker recently pointed out that scientific thinking is the core of the Toyota Way – The core to Lean. Talking about it, I can only recommend reading his latest book.

4P model adapted by Jeffrey K. Liker - "The Toyota Way 2nd Edition" ISBN 978-1260468519

Possibilities – Not Limitations

When my first “coachee” and I came together to reflect after a few months and after achieving our first challenge, we suddenly saw many tools in a new light. We began to ask ourselves, for example, whether 5S and other solutions do not arise naturally as long as one takes a more scientific approach. Scientific thinking also means examining phenomena and looking at them for patterns using data and facts.

“We are doomed to failure without a daily destruction of our various preconceptions.”

For example, if we were to work without any prior knowledge of Lean tools to do our daily work neatly and in one go, we would sooner or later find that a well-sorted and arranged workplace positively affects our work. It may not require any persuasion, mechanistic top-down approach or implementation frenzy for short-term gains.

Maybe, all it takes is someone to work with us on a challenge or problem and something we would like to work on, which helps our organisation improve. And maybe it just needs someone to help us identify obstacles on that road of uncertainty, which prevent us from succeeding daily.

Lets work together on this hypothesis

If this is the case, then employees themselves will come to new insights and may even be motivated to move on to the next challenge or problem and experiment with their own ideas. It should be clear to everyone that employees talk, especially when a manager is not present. But what effect does it have when employees share their ideas and compare their research results?

That is a question I would like to get to the bottom of with companies in Denmark in the future. So if you are one of them, don’t hesitate to get in contact with me.

And what did you learn from taking this step?

As Kata Coaches, we usually ask our Coachees what they did learn from taking this step. Now and since you have come to the end of my blog post, I would like to ask you what your take away is. Maybe you want to let me know down in the comments.

And finally, and as promised, find my first attempt at an elevator pitch right below. As a part of my personal challenges, I will definitely add some videos presenting pitches in the future.

Until then, please take care and see you in the next post.

Dominik.

Elevator Pitch

Illustration for Toyota Kata Elevator Pitch
Toyota Kata Elevator Pitch

“Hey, Dominik, may I ask you what Toyota Kata is?”

“Thank you for that great question. So, Toyota Kata is about building up routines that help us, our teams and organisations to overcome challenging goals even in tough and uncertain times. These routines help us then striving to develop a scientific response habit, so we can react quickly to obstacles that suddenly appear.”

“There are two types of Kata. The first one is based on a four steps model and called the Improvement Kata. The second one is the Coaching Kata and through which we can help others learn the Improvement Kata. Both of these Kata come with what we call Starter-Kata. Small practice routines, making it fairly easy to get started.”

“What is truly remarkable about this practice is that it only takes twenty minutes a day to improve your problem-solving skills and to learn a meta-skill that can be applied everywhere in life. Applying these means in your organisation will increase the skills and motivation of anyone practising, helping you build an innovation engine that continuously improves your company towards sustainable success.”

“Wow, this is quite a lot; how do I get started?”

“Let’s get a coffee and talk about your challenge….”

Dear reader, in this blog post, I will shed light on the Toyota Kata with a personal touch. That means, in addition to a formal introduction, I have also included my own experiences and thought-provoking questions and opinions.

During this learning journey, we will get to know some facets and effects of the Kata, such as;

  • Why is it called “Toyota” Kata?
  • What significance Mike Rother’s research results could have for us?
  • How does it influence one’s own thinking processes?
  • What supposed advantages and possibilities result from it?

 

And, at the very end, a summary in the form of an elevator pitch. I hope you enjoy reading.

What is the Toyota Kata?

Answering this question for someone else who has not yet gained sufficient practical experience is something I still find exciting, even after almost three years. Why? Because I can still discover and learn something new every day.

For example, a week ago, I attended KataCon Europe, a convention where we share research, findings, learn together and have a great time networking. Following this convention lead to many new impressions and things I still need to reflect over.

Then I’m part of a learning group that People Centred Excellence organizes, and where Graham Canning, Mike Denison and Tilo Schwarz ensure that we can deepen our scientific thinking learning experience upon diverse challenges coming from the learning group themselves.

KataConEurope Quote Feed

That said, it might be a pity if I had to reduce the Kata to just a few words unless it was to explain to my daughter what daddy actually does. Or, of course, if you and I met and you did ask me the same question. So, for that purpose, I share an elevator pitch at the end of this blog post.

If I had to answer this question right now, I would probably say: “Kata, that is learning something every day by comparing what I believe and what an experiment shows me afterwards.”

“I’ve certainly rethought everything I thought I knew.”

Since I have come across Kata and experienced the potentials for myself, many things have indeed changed. For example, how I reflect on what I see and read. My Kata colleague Ann Hill from the UK recently quoted her NHS team at KataCon, saying: “Toyota Kata has challenged what we thought Lean was, I’ve certainly rethought everything I thought I knew.”

To be honest, I don’t feel much different about it, but why is that so?

Maybe that is because Kata teaches us a completely different way of dealing with our knowledge threshold, and we all have more of them than we tend to realise. Therefore, one observable effect of practising Kata might be that we learn to transfer thoughts from the subconscious to the conscious mind. By that, we get a good chance to re-evaluate our own thoughts daily.

Is that already Kata?

No. It is not quite that simple, and we should avoid jumping to a conclusion at this point. The latter is something our brain prefers to do, going from one moment to the next into that state of pretending to know, without our consciously noticing.

Kata is about more than simple results and outcomes. Kata is more about the way we get there and how we make it a conscious approach. Therefore, it is more a question of how I do something rather than purely looking at what I am doing in the first place. I found this remarkable because good and sustainable results cannot be achieved through thoughtless action.

Current Knowledge Threshold - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

If we look at the term “Kata” from the perspective of language, then “Kata” comes from the Japanese language and means pattern, small routines or a way of doing something. An athlete, for example, learning Karate, practises Karate-Kata. After long practice, small steps and movements become a routine and are then combined into a flow of different movements.

When I learned to play soccer, I first had to stop the ball and pass it on. Only much later did tactical processes come into play. All of this together emerges into situational awareness and behaviour on the field and during a match. In principle, the Toyota Kata is, therefore, more than the sum of its parts. However, to describe this in a blog post remains a challenge in itself.

Why “Toyota” Kata?

Why it is called “Toyota” Kata can be deduced from Mike Rother’s six years of research in which he tried to unlock further secrets of Toyota’s success. In the course of this work, he asked himself the following two questions:

(a) What are the unseen managerial routines and thinking that lie behind Toyota´s success with continuous improvement and adaptation?

(b) How can other companies develop similar routines and thinking in their organizations?

Toyota Kata Books and Scientific Thinking

As part of the global Lean community, I am, of course, very grateful for these questions because what drove Mike and many of his partners in the research was the fact that they had long suspected that there must be something deeper driving Toyota. We have observed that simply copying the visible artefacts is not enough to drive sustainable and, above all, continuous development and improvement of an organisation.

I observed something similar when I experimented with Lean tools for the first time more than 12 years ago. At that time, for example, I couldn’t understand why many of my colleagues weren’t into all the cool stuff that helped us make our problems and challenges so visible.

Of course, I was also naïve and indeed more blind than I am today because I now believe that analytical thinking and the joy of challenge are not the general attitudes. I wonder what the reason for that is, and I’ll certainly take that up again in another post.

As far as our experiments are concerned, we have, of course, had successes to celebrate. Unfortunately, however, most of them were relatively short-lived because the underlying mindsets were not conveyed at that time. The latter, I believe, was also due to the mechanistic top-down approach we typically used to implement something quickly these days.

At Toyota, you won’t find Toyota Kata

At Toyota itself, a Toyota Kata is unknown. The Kata is based on the research results in which Mike Rother, after numerous interviews with Toyota executives and Mikes own experiments, was able to identify a repetitive pattern of behaviour and acting. However, it should be noted that the executives in the interviews had difficulties describing exactly how they think and act.

But is that surprising when something has already become second nature?

If I ask a piano player, who has practised for thousands of hours, why he or she plays so well, and what is going on in his or her mind while he or she is playing, then he or she will not be able to make it tangible for me in a few words.

At Toyota, and undoubtedly interesting for Mike’s research, was the fact that every leader also has his or her own style. At this point, I would like to recommend Katie Anderson’s book “Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn”, in which she describes the learning journey of a former Toyota leader named Isao Yoshino. This book reveals more about the different styles that Mike might have encountered.

Four steps Improvement Kata - A non-linear way to overcome challenging goals - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

The pattern Mike Rother discovered was a scientific way of thinking that is passed on from leader to leader at Toyota and, of course, to each employee through a coaching style. This way of thinking and acting encourages employees and other leaders to avoid jumping to conclusions and instead become aware of their knowledge limitations and experiment quickly with new solutions.

What does this mean for us?

For example, we should be aware that when we copy solutions from Toyota, we are only holding a snapshot in our hands, never the underlying deeper understanding. Perhaps we would be better advised to address the second question of the research results and then develop our own solutions.

If I look at the current state of affairs in Denmark, there is undoubtedly much worthwhile work for all of us.

A difference that makes a difference

I stumbled across the Kata for the first time in 2018. Within a few seconds, I was overcome with a feeling that I might be a big step closer to a possible solution for my observations; A way to give all my colleagues and co-worker the chance to test their own ideas for continuous improvement of processes and systems. So promoting the opposite of what we have already seen does not work—top-down implementations.

I suddenly saw many things in a different light, including why we were so successful for a short time with an idea of a cross-functional team that involved many employees in developing solutions. If we had known about the Starter Kata back then, who knows, we might have developed our own long ago. Among other things, this would have made it easier for us to pass on to our employees the many good and sometimes very scientific approaches hidden in, e.g. the FMEA.

Unfortunately, however, time was against us at that time, and so APQP and PPAP remained instead artefacts and artefacts always have a terrible taste. Because if you have not been involved in developing methods and tools yourself, it becomes tough to convey the underlying ways of thinking.

Comparing what we expect to happen and what actually happens - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

The great advantage?

Perhaps this is also the great advantage of the Toyota Kata exercises. Because this is what it is all about in the first place. It develops basic ways of thinking and uses the newly acquired skills to build your own tools and methods that suit you.

To me, this is a difference that actually makes a difference.

Although I am still a vast Toyota and incredibly Lean fan – even if there is no clear description for it – I want to ask whether it is not time to entirely focus on one’s own ways of thinking and acting?

I don’t know if it is wise that we constantly fish for foreign solutions in foreign waters, when our own problems and challenges are very individual and, in my opinion, therefore also need unique solutions.

Maybe you could give me your perspective on this in the comments.

The components of Kata

The Kata that supports us in learning these basic ways of thinking and acting, a more scientific way of thinking, comes in two components that emerged from Mike Rother’s second research question.

One component we call the Improvement Kata, and it is the core based on a 4 step but non-linear model. The exercises that we do in the direction of a challenge and the perspective of the actual current condition lead after a while to a real meta-skill that we can apply in all aspects of life. 

The second component is what we call the Coaching Kata. This serves to create a learning environment for those who apply the Improvement Kata in which the “improver” achieves learning success through deliberate daily practice.

Change comes from repeated experiences with a new pattern - Source: Toyota Kata Practice Guide

Start with Starter Kata

Both components can be practised using Starter Kata. However, these Starter Kata are only the prelude and not the goal. The Coaching Kata is primarily intended for managers who, thanks to this Coaching Kata, help their employees to develop this new way of thinking. But be careful; to coach at all, you first have to become good at applying the Improvement Kata yourself.

Also, we often see that some coaches think there is nothing more to learn or improve once they go and coach, but both Starter Kata go hand in hand. Isn’t it desirable in an organisation that everyone improves the business every day?

I don’t want to detail the two components in this blog post, but instead, I will elaborate on them in other blog posts. However, you may like reading the FAQ that I am linking here.

TPS is built on the scientific way of thinking…. How do I respond to this problem? Not a toolbox. [You have to be] willing to start small, learn through trial and error.

Hajime Ohba - One of Ohno’s students Tweet

The false claim when to start with Kata

From time to time, I run into claims that mention that practising Kata only makes sense if you can’t get any further with your Lean journey. But, unfortunately, whenever I run into these claims, it becomes obvious that somebody has not practised Kata for long. A pity, actually, because it reads like Toyota Kata and its Starter Kata are just used as another tool in their portfolio and not to develop a critical mass of people that can respond more scientifically to organisational challenges.

Developing this critical mass of people through a continuous learning journey might be a key challenge for any organisation who want to ensure their survival capabilities. If you like, you can read more about potential threats to the survival of an organisation here.

Jeffrey K Liker recently pointed out that scientific thinking is the core of the Toyota Way – The core to Lean. Talking about it, I can only recommend reading his latest book.

4P model adapted by Jeffrey K. Liker - "The Toyota Way 2nd Edition" ISBN 978-1260468519

Possibilities – Not Limitations

When my first “coachee” and I came together to reflect after a few months and after achieving our first challenge, we suddenly saw many tools in a new light. We began to ask ourselves, for example, whether 5S and other solutions do not arise naturally as long as one takes a more scientific approach. Scientific thinking also means examining phenomena and looking at them for patterns using data and facts.

“We are doomed to failure without a daily destruction of our various preconceptions.”

For example, if we were to work without any prior knowledge of Lean tools to do our daily work neatly and in one go, we would sooner or later find that a well-sorted and arranged workplace positively affects our work. It may not require any persuasion, mechanistic top-down approach or implementation frenzy for short-term gains.

Maybe, all it takes is someone to work with us on a challenge or problem and something we would like to work on, which helps our organisation improve. And maybe it just needs someone to help us identify obstacles on that road of uncertainty, which prevent us from succeeding daily.

Lets work together on this hypothesis

If this is the case, then employees themselves will come to new insights and may even be motivated to move on to the next challenge or problem and experiment with their own ideas. It should be clear to everyone that employees talk, especially when a manager is not present. But what effect does it have when employees share their ideas and compare their research results?

That is a question I would like to get to the bottom of with companies in Denmark in the future. So if you are one of them, don’t hesitate to get in contact with me.

And what did you learn from taking this step?

As Kata Coaches, we usually ask our Coachees what they did learn from taking this step. Now and since you have come to the end of my blog post, I would like to ask you what your take away is. Maybe you want to let me know down in the comments.

And finally, and as promised, find my first attempt at an elevator pitch right below. As a part of my personal challenges, I will definitely add some videos presenting pitches in the future.

Until then, please take care and see you in the next post.

Dominik.

Elevator Pitch

Illustration for Toyota Kata Elevator Pitch
Toyota Kata Elevator Pitch

“Hey, Dominik, may I ask you what Toyota Kata is?”

“Thank you for that great question. So, Toyota Kata is about building up routines that help us, our teams and organisations to overcome challenging goals even in tough and uncertain times. These routines help us then striving to develop a scientific response habit, so we can react quickly to obstacles that suddenly appear.”

“There are two types of Kata. The first one is based on a four steps model and called the Improvement Kata. The second one is the Coaching Kata and through which we can help others learn the Improvement Kata. Both of these Kata come with what we call Starter-Kata. Small practice routines, making it fairly easy to get started.”

“What is truly remarkable about this practice is that it only takes twenty minutes a day to improve your problem-solving skills and to learn a meta-skill that can be applied everywhere in life. Applying these means in your organisation will increase the skills and motivation of anyone practising, helping you build an innovation engine that continuously improves your company towards sustainable success.”

“Wow, this is quite a lot; how do I get started?”

“Let’s get a coffee and talk about your challenge….”

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